Connect with us

Health

Global heating ‘may lead to epidemic of kidney disease’

kidney disease

Global heating ‘may lead to epidemic of kidney disease’

Chronic kidney disease linked to heat stress could become a major health epidemic for millions of workers around the world as global temperatures increase over the coming decades, doctors have warned.

More research into the links between heat and CKDu – chronic kidney disease of uncertain cause – is urgently needed to assess the potential scale of the problem, they have said.

Unlike the conventional form of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which is a progressive loss of kidney function largely seen among elderly people and those afflicted with other conditions such as diabetes and hypertension, epidemics of CKDu have already emerged primarily in hot, rural regions of countries such as El Salvador and Nicaragua, where abnormally high numbers of agricultural workers have begun dying from irreversible kidney failure.

CKDu has also started to be recorded as affecting large numbers of people doing heavy manual labour in hot temperatures in other parts of Central America as well as North America, South America, the Middle East, Africa and India.

Kidneys are responsible for fluid balance in the body, which makes them particularly sensitive to extreme temperatures. There is an emerging consensus that CKDu should be recognised as a heat stress-related injury, where workers are developing subtle damage to their kidneys each day while they are in the field. This in turn can develop into severe kidney disease or complete renal failure over time.

This repetitive low-grade assault on the kidneys does not necessarily come with symptoms, so workers may not even know they are getting sick over time until things get so bad that they end up with end-stage kidney disease, said Dr Cecilia Sorensen, director of the global consortium on climate and health education at Columbia University.

“I think we just have no idea what the scope of the problem is because we’re not doing surveillance for it,” she said. “There are some regions that are clearly hotspots but in terms of its prevalence and how serious a problem it is, I don’t even think we’ve begun to wrap our brains around it.”

The documented epidemics, however, have similar characteristics. Those affected tend to be people who work in hot conditions outdoors and come from disproportionately vulnerable backgrounds – socially and economically – with limited access to medical care or insurance, or live in areas with modest healthcare infrastructure.

Sorensen said that, according to current data, it appears that the severity of the kidney damage gets worse the more vulnerable and desperate the worker is. She says that those who have no control over their working conditions or are incentivised to work for longer hours with no breaks, such as workers paid for how many berries they pick or how much sugar cane they cut, are likely to be those worst affected.

“They’re getting sick from the work that they’re doing, but they have no other options, and there’s very little regulatory oversight in the work environment that prevents this from happening. It’s a huge blind spot and a human rights issue,” she said.

Dr Ramón García Trabanino, a clinical nephrologist and medical director at El Salvador’s Centre of Hemodialysis, first noticed an unusual number of CKD patients saturating his hospital as a medical student more than two decades ago.

“They were young men,” he said, “and they were dying because we didn’t have the budget or the capacity to give them dialysis treatment. We did the best we could, but they kept dying and more kept coming.”

Since then he has started researching similar epidemics in Mexico, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama.

“If you take a look at the maximum temperature maps in the region in Central America, you will notice that they match the regions where we are describing the disease, the hotspots,” he said. “El Salvador and Nicaragua – every year we have a fight for the first place for the country with the highest mortality due to CKD. Our mortality rates are about 10 times higher than what we should expect. The number of new patients is overwhelming.”

Although the consensus view is that CKDu is related to heat exposure and dehydration, some scientists believe exposure to agrochemicals and infectious agents, as well as genetic makeup and risk factors related to poverty, malnutrition, and other social determinants of health, are also likely to play a role.

Prof Richard Johnson, of the University of Colorado’s school of medicine, said: “What is less clear is the fact that recurrent heat stress is not just a problem in the sugar cane fields of Nicaragua. Even in our own societies, the possibility that heat stress and dehydration can be playing a role in kidney disease is not as appreciated.”

Prof Tord Kjellstrom, of the Australian National University’s national centre for epidemiology and population health, said that heat stress is not getting the attention it needs in debates around how to mitigate the worst effects of the climate emergency.

“As the number and intensity of hot days increases, more and more working people will face even greater challenges to avoid heat stress, particularly the two-thirds of the global population who live in tropical and sub-tropical areas. Heat exhaustion threatens the livelihoods of millions and undermines efforts to reduce poverty,” said Kjellstrom, who is also a former member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

“Global heating is a serious threat both to workers’ lives and the livelihoods of millions of people. Emerging policies on climate must take this into account if we are to have any chance of getting to grips with what is ahead.”

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

3 × 2 =

Health

AIDS Agency Chief Says 1 Out Of 100 Persons Positive In Kaduna

The Executive Secretary of Kaduna State Aids Control Agency (KADSACA), Dr Isa Baka has said a survey had revealed that one out of 100 people is positive to the AIDS disease in the state.

Baka disclosed this speaking shortly after a walk in commemoration of the World AIDS Day, on Thursday in Kaduna.

The theme of the year’s’ World AIDS Day is “Equalise to End AIDS: Equal Access to Treatment and Prevention Services’’.

He said the present statistics was a remarkable development against previous survey which gave 11 of every 100 people in the state.

Baka added that the AIDS prevalence in Kaduna, which is at 1.1, being a survey carried out by the state government itself, was later done at the national level, where that of Kaduna was confirmed as very accurate.

“At the national level, the prevalence of the virus (AIDS) was at 1.4 (four people out of 100 test positive), while that of Kaduna is confirmed to be 1.1, was in determination of the state government and KADSACA’s efforts to ensure minimal prevalence of the virus,” he said.

He said as part of efforts to continue reducing the prevalence of AIDS in the state, government initiated programmes across the 23 LGAs.

He said one of the UNICEF anchored programmes, which is the ‘Adolescent and Youths Living With HIV and AIDS’ programme, was present and effective in at least, 18 LGAs and 24 sites in the state.

Continue Reading

Health

Malawi Commences Large Scale Malaria Vaccination- First In The World

Malawi has commenced large-scale vaccination of children against malaria.

This is the first large-scale malaria vaccination campaign since the World Health Organisation (WHO) endorsed the widespread use of the RTS,S/AS01 (RTS,S) malaria vaccine in October 2021.

The endorsement followed a two-year vaccination programme, which involved more than 800,000 children in Ghana, Kenya and Malawi.

Recommended for children from five months of age to around 18 months, the vaccine  has an efficacy of 39 percent.

The first phase of the vaccination in Malawi is expected to cover 11 of the country’s 28 districts.

In a tweet on Tuesday, the WHO in Malawi said the expansion of access to the malaria vaccine will enable more children at risk of malaria to benefit from an additional prevention tool.

“Malawi has expanded access to the first malaria vaccine! The expansion of the RTS,S Malaria vaccine, into the 11 districts that participated in the malaria vaccine implementation program (MVIP) has been launched today. The vaccine offers a glimmer hope for Malawi,” WHO wrote.

Michael Kayange, Malawi’s national malaria control programme manager, told the BBC’s Focus on Africa that although the vaccine has low efficacy, “in malaria control, there is no single intervention that does it all”.

Continue Reading

Health

Nigeria Yet To Attain 70% Covid-19 Vaccination Coverage- NPHCDA

The National Primary Health Care Development Agency (NPHCDA) has disclosed that Nigeria is yet to achieve 70 percent coverage for COVID-19 vaccination.

Faisal Shuaib, executive director of NPHCDA, said on Tuesday that as of November 25, a total of 56,790,371 eligible persons targeted for COVID-19 vaccination are fully vaccinated while 12,492,646 are partially vaccinated in 36 states and the FCT.

“We are 21.6 million eligible persons away from reaching its target of fully vaccinating 70 percent of its eligible population by December 2022,” he said.

“But 62 percent of the country’s eligible population is at least partially vaccinated against COVID-19.

“The country has fully vaccinated half of the total population eligible for COVID-19 vaccination.

“We have also fully vaccinated an additional over 25 percent of its eligible population, in the last 110 days of SCALES 3.0 implementation.”

The executive director said 13.2 percent of fully vaccinated persons in the country have received the COVID-19 booster dose for additional protection against the virus.

He commended the COVID-19 strategy group for achieving 50 percent vaccination coverage in the country and promised that the momentum would be sustained.

Shuaib said he has also directed the team to intensify efforts toward the attainment of herd immunity.

“Until this is achieved, the strategy group will continue to develop strategies that will help the country achieve health security,” he said.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending